Latest & Greatest – ABA Trial Preparation Resources

By Bruce W. Felmly Published by American Bar Association Section of Litigation and First Chair Press (2015) KF 8915 .F47 2015

By Bruce W. Felmly

Published by American Bar Association Section of Litigation and First Chair Press (2015)

KF 8915 .F47 2015

In support of its mission of making practical resources available to members of the legal profession, the American Bar Association has published two resources that assist lawyers with trial preparation: Preparing for Trial: 60 Days and Counting and One Hundred Days Before Trial: A Family Lawyer's Guide to Preparation and Strategy.

In his book, Preparing for Trial: 60 Days and Counting, Bruce W. Felmly walks the reader through a trial scenario from the moment the notice setting trial is received to the morning of the trial. Breaking down the 60 days into smaller increments, Felmly explains the tasks that need to or should be performed, such as scheduling, planning trial presentation techniques, conducting mock trials, preparing the pretrial filings, drafting a version of the opening statement, attending the pretrial conference, and preparing the client and witnesses. Following Felmly’s systematic approach will make the task ahead not seem so daunting.

By Steven N. Peskind Published by the American Bar Association Section of Family Law (2015) KF 505.5 .P47 2015

By Steven N. Peskind

Published by the American Bar Association Section of Family Law (2015)

KF 505.5 .P47 2015

For the family lawyer, help comes in the form of Steven Peskind's One Hundred Days Before Trial: A Family Lawyer's Guide to Preparation and Strategy. Peskind guides the reader through the steps and preparations that must be or should be completed during the 100 days leading up to the trial of a family law case. Organized by segments based upon some suggested time periods, the author proposes certain tasks that lawyers should perform. For instance, witnesses, both lay and expert, should ideally be considered 60 days before trial, and 30 days prior to trial would probably be a good time to prepare opening and closing statements and draft any final pretrial motions. At the end of each chapter, there is a checklist to keep track of what has been done and what has yet to be done. This book is a great resource not only for the family lawyer but also for any lawyer who needs a bit of help with staying on track and keeping organized.

Look for both of these titles at the Harris County Law Library!