Renewed On-Demand Learning Opportunities from the Legal Tech Institute

The Legal Tech Institute at Harris County Law Library is happy to announce that one of the most popular programs in our LTI Lecture Series is once again available on the LTI On-demand Learning page. The Robot Lawyer: Artificial Intelligence in the Practice of Law can be viewed on our YouTube channel, accessible via our Legal Tech Institute web pages. Licensed Texas attorneys can earn 1.0 hour of CLE credit from now until September 30, 2019. Guest speaker, Saskia Mehlhorn, Director of Knowledge Management & Library Services for Norton Rose Fulbright US, provides a basic overview of AI in the legal profession, gives specific examples of tools that incorporate AI technology, and discusses opportunities for lawyers and other legal professionals to benefit from the power of AI technology.

While visiting our On-demand Learning page, be sure to check out our other recorded CLE programs, which carry a total of 3.0 hours of CLE credit and .75 hours of ethics credit. Included in the series are the following:

Finding & Formatting Legal Forms (1.0 hour CLE)

Legal Practice Technology (1.0 hour CLE)

The Ethics of Cloud Computing (1.0 hoiur CLE, .75 hour ethics)

The Robot Lawyer (1.0 hour CLE)

Don’t forget that we also offer a Hands-on Legal Tech Training session every Thursday at 2:00 pm in the Law Library’s Legal Tech Lab. Join us!

Celebrate the Texas Day of Civility in the Law by Earning Free CLE Credit in Ethics

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Tomorrow, Friday, April 20, is the Texas Day of Civility in the Law. The State Bar of Texas calls upon legal professionals to observe this day by reaffirming their commitment to the Texas Lawyer's Creed, which calls for attorneys to conduct themselves with courtesy and professionalism toward judges, adversaries, peers, colleagues, and clients.

Local bar associations across the state will be celebrating, marking the day with a variety of events, several of which will offer free CLE credit in ethics.

The Dallas Bar Association, along with the Dallas Bar Foundation, American Board of Trial Advocates, AlixPartners, Inns of Court, and the State Bar of Texas Professionalism Committee will be hosting the Day of Civility at the Belo Mansion in downtown Dallas and offering 4.5 hours of CLE in ethics.

A live stream of the seminar will be available for those who are unable to attend. State Bar President Tom Vick will give the opening remarks. For more information, contact Kathryn Zack at (214) 220-7450 or kzack@dallasbar.org.

The Houston Bar Association will be hosting a number of events as well, including an open CLE video-watching event, the perfect opportunity to earn CLE/ethics credit at no charge. Bring your lunch or snacks the HBA office between the hours of 8:30 am and 4:30 pm to view the videos. The office is located at 1111 Bagby Street, FLB 200, Houston, 77002.

Finally, the Texas Center for Legal Ethics will be offering free online CLE ethics credit online. Topics include The Noble Lawyer and Developing Your Professional Reputation.

Whether you're approaching your birth date and need to earn CLE credit in a hurry, or you'd just like to log your ethics credit now in preparation for your Bar license renewal date, these offerings are excellent opportunities to reflect on professionalism and civility in the law as you learn. 

 

Latest & Greatest – Encryption Made Simple for Lawyers

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   By David G. Ries, Sharon D. Nelson, and John W. Simek  Published by ABA Law Practice Division  QA 76.9 .A25 N455 2015

By David G. Ries, Sharon D. Nelson, and John W. Simek

Published by ABA Law Practice Division

QA 76.9 .A25 N455 2015

Seeking to take the fear out of encryption and what it entails, the authors of Encryption Made Simple for Lawyers set upon the task of proving that encrypting information is not as complicated and difficult as it may seem to those not fully versed in the language of “techspeak”. From its earliest forms, e.g. ciphers and secret decoder rings, encryption has been used to make communications secret and secure, and in this age of cyberterrorism and data breaches, understanding how to encrypt confidential information has taken on even greater importance. The authors begin by explaining, in simple terms, the basics of encryption technology, such as the Data Encryption Standard algorithm, digital certificates, and symmetric and asymmetric encryption before discussing the nuances of encrypting laptops and desktops, smartphones, and portable drives. The authors also stress the need to protect data as it travels through various networks or into the cloud as well as the practicality of securing individual documents.

If you don’t think that you need to encrypt or further secure your documents, you may be mistaken. As the authors readily point out: lawyers have an ethical obligation to keep communications confidential. Encryption Made Simple for Lawyers can help you perform that duty or, at a minimum, convince you that you need to obtain the services of a qualified professional. Don’t wait until a data breach to take action.

Latest and Greatest – Ethics in the Practice of Elder Law

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   By Roberta K. Flowers and Rebecca C. Morgan  American Bar Association and the Aba Section of Real Property, Trust and Estate Law  KF 390 .A4 F56 2013

By Roberta K. Flowers and Rebecca C. Morgan

American Bar Association and the Aba Section of Real Property, Trust and Estate Law

KF 390 .A4 F56 2013

Designed for the attorney who is new to the field of elder law, Ethics in the Practice of Elder Law, provides an overview of the unique ethical issues that may arise when handling matters for elderly clients and for the people who are acting on their behalf. Focusing on the ABA Model Rules of Professional Conduct (rather than individual state rules), the authors examine such topics as identifying the client and the parties to whom the attorney can speak and represent, acting for the client with diminished capacity, recognizing and handling ethical issues in guardianship practice, ascertaining the true client in complex fiduciary representation cases, and dealing with ethical issues during litigation, in the provision of ancillary, non-legal services, and in marketing the elder law practice. In each chapter, you will find a practical question checklist as well as a detailed analysis of the applicable Model Rules. The book also includes the National Academy of Elder Law Attorneys Aspirational Standards, pertinent ABA Ethics Opinions, checklists, and sample letters and notices.

So, if you are new to the practice of elder law or simply need a refresher on your ethical obligations, come to the Harris County Law Library and have a look at Ethics in the Practice of Elder Law as well as some of our other elder law resources, including CLE materials, Texas Elder Law and Elderlaw: Advocacy for the Aging.